Posted by: Frederick Cornwell Sanders | 2013/11/21

“November 21, 1898” by Rick Sanders

René Magritte

René Magritte (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

In 1898, René Magritte, the Belgian painter is born. He dies in 1967. Arguably, he is the greatest of the surrealist painters. Wikipedia relates the following:

René François Ghislain Magritte (21 November 1898 – 15 August 1967) was a Belgian surrealist artist. He became well-known for a number of witty and thought-provoking images that fall under the umbrella of surrealism. His work challenges observers’ preconditioned perceptions of reality.

Contemporary artists have been greatly influenced by René Magritte’s stimulating examination of the fickleness of images. Some artists who have been influenced by Magritte’s works include John Baldessari, Ed Ruscha, Andy Warhol, Jasper Johns, Jan Verdoodt, Martin Kippenberger, Duane Michals and Storm Thorgerson. Some of the artists’ works integrate direct references and others offer contemporary viewpoints on his abstract fixations.

Magritte’s use of simple graphic and everyday imagery has been compared to that of the Pop artists. His influence in the development of Pop art has been widely recognized, although Magritte himself discounted the connection. He considered the Pop artists’ representation of “the world as it is” as “their error”, and contrasted their attention to the transitory with his concern for “the feeling for the real, insofar as it is permanent.” The 2006–2007 LACMA exhibition “Magritte and Contemporary Art: The Treachery of Images” examined the relationship between Magritte and contemporary art.

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